May 27, 2012

[Even So, I Am Still a Geek]

This blog post makes me sad:
"I’m into geeky stuff. I like comics, Science Fiction and Fantasy, RPGs and computer games. I like geek movies and series and products. But I don’t like geek culture.  I don’t like the entitlement. I don’t like the sexism. I don’t like the racism. I don’t like the homophobia. The pettiness. The viciousness for the sake of being vicious. The proudly proclaimed ignorance and disdain for your fellow geeks and the world at large.
Don’t call me a geek. I’m better than that."

  As much as I have railed against issues in gamer culture over the years, I still identify myself as a gamer, and as a geek. There are some people, however, who have chosen to reject those labels entirely and the community as a whole, because of the toxic behavior that become tolerated in many gaming circles as 'normal'. I find it incredibly disappointing that some people feel that as a community, geeks and gamers are not worth identifying with because of the failings of some who call themselves either of those things.

  I will never reject the label of 'geek', because I really feel that simply encouraging more people to stand up and speak out against things like homophobia and sexism in gaming can make a difference, and make our communities better for us all. Giving up says that there is nothing of value in our gaming/geek communities and the only option is to reject them entirely, which I strongly disagree with.

Related Reading: All These Sexist Gaming Dudes Are Some Shook Ones
                         The Angry Fundamentalists of the Church of Gaming


1 comment:

Syl said...

I agree very much with this. If we withdraw from calling ourselves gamers or geeks, we further stigmatize something that deserves no stigma. Only by embracing who we are, can we prove to others that 'gamers' aren't one big mass of immature trolls or asocial slobs. It's a slow process, but these days it's already much easier already to talk about gaming as an accepted hobby than for example in the 80ies.
Take a 'bad word', make it yours - if enough people do this its bad spell is lifted.